Thanksgiving from: Pacific Paratrooper

Pacific Paratrooper

Rakkasans of today.
187th RCT

I WISH TO EXPRESS MY THANKS FOR EACH AND EVERYONE OF YOU !!!  AND MAY WE ALL BE THANKFUL FOR THOSE VETERANS WHO FIGHT FOR US !!!

US troops in Afghanistan give thanks.

Thanksgiving during WWII…

They’re celebrating Thanksgiving on this very day,

My thoughts are at home, though I’m far away;

I can see everyone, eating dinner deluxe,

Whether it be chicken, turkey or even duck;

The fellows over here won’t whimper or moan,

They’ll look to the next one and hope to be home.

 

Truly and honestly, from way down deep,

They want you to be happy and enjoy your feast.

These holidays are remembered by one and all,

Those happy days we can always recall.

The ones in the future, will be happier, I know

When we all come back from defeating the foe.

_______Poem by an Anonymous WWII Veteran

For…

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About the Museum of the American Military Family

Pacific War in art – 1945

Pacific Paratrooper

I wish all of the distinguished artists of WWII could have been included – here is the final year of the Pacific War…

“Battle of Luzon” by: Yorozujiro Terauchi, 1945
Mandalay, Burma, by: David Pentland, Feb. ’45
Pacific Glory” by: Nicholas Trudgian

It is March 1945 and the P-38’s of the 475th FG are involved in a huge dogfight with Japanese Zeros over the coast of Indo-China. Flying “Pee Wee V” is Lt Ken Hart of the 431st Fighter Squadron, who has fatally damaged a Zero in a blistering head on encounter. The second P-38L – “Vickie” – belongs to Captain John ‘rabbit’ Pietz, who would end the War as an Ace with six victories.
Signed by three highly decorated P-38 pilots who flew in combat with the 475th Fighter Group in the Pacific theatre during World War II.

‘The Great Tokyo Air Raid’ by: Hashimoto Kimisuke, 10 March ’45…

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Pacific War in art – 1944

Pacific Paratrooper

As promised, here is an example of other works of art for the following year of the Pacific War…

USMC in the Marshall Islands, 31 Jan 1944, by: James V. Griffin

 

Truk Island, Carolinas, by: Frank Lemon

 

RNZAF, May 1944 with Corsairs

 

Saipan Jun-july 1944, by: Robert Benney

 

War Weary, by: Jack Fellows

 

Guam, July-Aug. by: Howard Gerard

 

Peleliu Invaded, Sept. 1944, By: Tom Lea

 

Avengers of the Philippines, by: John D. Shaw

November 14, 1944 . . . As smoldering enemy ships mark a trail to Manila Bay, Avengers and Hellcats of Air Group 51 overfly the isle of Corregidor on their return to the carrier U.S.S. San Jacinto.

With the misty mountains of Bataan standing as a silent sentinel, Naval LT (JG) George H.W. Bush pilots his TBM in one of his last combat missions of WWII. The valor of Bush’s…

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Pacific War in art – 1943

Pacific Paratrooper

TO CONTINUE OUR MINI-GALLERY OF DISTINGUISHED ARTIST’S VIEW OF WWII ……

RAAF Kittyhawk Squadron, Milne Bay, New Guinea, by: Jack Fellows

5th Air Force & RAAF, Battle of the Bismark Sea

USS Bailey, Battle of Komandorski, by I.R. Lloyd

“Mission Accomplished”, Yamamoto shot down, 18 April 1943, by Roy Grinnell

Japanese postcard, Aleutian Campaign

The Solomons, by: Peter Dennis

IJN Amagiri ramming PT-109

‘Marine Raider’ Bougainville, by: Marc Erickson

Tarawa by: Tom Lovell

Pappy Boyington, F-4U Corsair, by: Craig Tinder

Cape Gloucester, Solomons, 26 Dec. 1943

Resources:

IHRA: for their blog and their books and prints

Jack Fellows website

“WWII: A Tribute in Art and Literature” edited by David Colbert

Nicholas Trudgian

http://www.nicolastrudgian.com/

I.R. Lloyd

http://ussbaileydd492.org/crew_signatures_on_ir_lloyd_painting_the_battle_of_the_komandorski_islands.html

Roy Grinnell

https://www.roygrinnellart.com/

CLICK ON IMAGES TO ENLARGE.

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Military Humor –

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Farewell Salutes –

Jack D. Baker – New Salisbury, IN; US Navy, WWII, USS Iowa

Gilbert Clarin – Turlock, CA; US…

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Pacific War in art – 1941 – 1942

Pacific Paratrooper

From some of our most prestigious artists come their depictions of the war…

PLEASE CLICK ON THE IMAGES TO GET THE FULL AFFECT.

“Tora, Tora, Tora”, by Robert McCall

“Battle of Slim River” by: Mark Stille

Japanese and war horses in Hong Kong

Japan in Dutch East Indies

Japan bombs Darwin, Australia, by” James Baines, Feb. 1942

Bataan Death March, by Ben Steele, himself a death march survivor from Montana, April 1942

Doolittle Raid, B-25 over Japan, by: Francis Bergese
18 April 1942

“Cactus Air Force” by: Jack Fellows, Guadalcanal

RAAF Kittyhawk Squadron, Milne Bay, New Guinea, by: William Dargie, Sept. 1942

“Action Over Salamaua”, by: Jack Fellows

Pictorial series to be continued…

Resources:

IHRA: for their blog and their books and prints

Jack Fellows website

William Dargie info

“WWII: A Tribute in Art and Literature” edited by David Colbert

This idea for this post arose from a discussion with…

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Museum of the American Military Family has many blogs and podcasts

The Museum of the American Military Family & Learning Center, located in Tijeras, NM, just east of Albuquerque collects  stories in a variety of formats. Check us out, and if you’re interested, send us a story…or two…or three! We will accept short video or audio files, as well as written posts for our blogs. Query us or send a written story  to: mamfwriter@gmail.com

 Our Podcast site is at

https://militaryfamilymuseum.podbean.com

 Audio Podcasts: Together We Serve: “Service” stories from Brats, Vets, Spouses & Others, Schooling With Uncle Sam: Teachers & Students talk about their DOD school stories, America Remembers ‘Nam: Veterans and their families share their thoughts on Vietnam, Brat Time Stories: Can’t sleep? Check out our middle-of-the-night bedtime stories, written by, about and for the insomniac Brat

Video Podcasts:  One Takes: Like the name implies, people share their stories in a short, unedited format, Kitchen Table Convos: The best conversations happen around the kitchen table,  At Ease!  Arts, Entertainment, Literature & Travel-there’s a little something for everyone…

Our Blogs:

At Ease: Books & More for Brats and their families, We Served Too

Passports & Pedagogy: Schooling with Uncle Sam; The American Military Family

Letters Home, America Remembers ‘Nam, MAMF Projects

 

Home Front – Hard to keep the good times rollin’

Pacific Paratrooper

[ This post was originally a guest post I wrote for Judy Guion @ Greatest Generation Lessons.  Being as times are rough these days, I thought a bit of comparison with what our parents and grandparents went through was in order. ]

Columnist Marquis Childs said after Pearl Harbor: “Nothing will ever be the same.”  Thirty-five years later he added: “It never has and never will be.”

We need to remember that in 1941 as much as 40% of U.S. families lived below the poverty level, approximately 8 million worked for less than minimum wage and another 8 million were unemployed.  The median income was about $2,000 per year.  The government, in virtually fighting two separate wars, entered into civilian lives by raising taxes, rationing, controlling prices and allotting jobs.

Once the war began, truck convoys became commonplace and train depots burst into arenas of activity.  The movement was not…

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Pin-up Girls Helped Win WWII

Pacific Paratrooper

America’s entrance into WWII triggered the golden age of WWII Pin-ups — pictures of smiling women in a range of clothing-challenged situations.  The racy photos adorned lonely servicemen’s lockers, the walls of barracks, and even the sides of planes.  For the first time in its history, the U.S. military unofficially sanctioned this kind of art: pin-up pictures, magazines and calendars were shipped and distributed among the troops, often at government expense.

No history of any military unit would be complete without some info on its favorite pin-ups.  Keep in mind that in the days prior to women being in every military unit, soldiers would be in the field or in combat for months on end, or years as in WWII, without seeing or hearing a female voice.

Although a little revealing at times, pin-ups were not what you would recall pornography.  No one knows for sure when this trend began…

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